Avalanche Advisory
Advisory: Logan Area Mountains Issued by Toby Weed for Wednesday - March 14, 2018 - 7:14am
bottom line

There is CONSIDERABLE danger in the backcountry and human triggered wet avalanches are likely. Dangerous wet and persistent slab avalanche conditions exist, especially in sheltered, sunny terrain.

  • Evaluate snow and terrain carefully. Make conservative decisions.
  • Avoid steep slopes with melt softened saturated snow.




special announcement

We have discount lift tickets for Alta, Snowbird, Brighton, Solitude, Snowbasin,and Beaver Mountain. Details and order information here. All proceeds from your purchase go towards paying for avalanche forecasting and education.‚Äč

current conditions

Too hot! Snow will soften early today after above freezing mountain temperatures at most stations overnight. The exception is the Sinks Area where temperatures dipped into the upper twenties. Increasing southwest wind, and clouds ahead of rain, thunder, and snow showers this afternoon should help to moderate dangerous wet avalanche conditions.

  • The Tony Grove Snotel at 8400' reports 36°F, and there's 65 inches of total snow, with 83% of normal SWE.
  • It's 26°F at the UDOT Hwy 89 Logan Summit this morning, and there's light east wind.
recent activity

In the past couple very warm days, natural wet loose avalanches have been running off the mountains in the Logan Zone like hot candle wax.

Natural wet avalanche activity on the west face of Cherry Peak, 3/13/18


Avalanche Problem 1
type aspect/elevation characteristics
LIKELIHOOD
LIKELY
UNLIKELY
SIZE
LARGE
SMALL
TREND
INCREASING DANGER
SAME
DECREASING DANGER
over the next 24 hours
description

Natural wet avalanches are likely in the heat of the day, especially in sheltered sunny terrain. Natural wet sluffs tend to catch people more than any other type of natural avalanche. Wet slab avalanches are possible in areas with poor snow structure.

  • Roller balls, pinwheels, and natural sluffs indicate possible loose wet activity
  • It's time to move off slopes if you are sinking into slushy or sticky snow
Avalanche Problem 2
type aspect/elevation characteristics
LIKELIHOOD
LIKELY
UNLIKELY
SIZE
LARGE
SMALL
TREND
INCREASING DANGER
SAME
DECREASING DANGER
over the next 24 hours
description

The warm weather is creating dangerous persistent slab avalanche conditions in some areas. The warmth is softening the slab layer and perhaps lubing up the weak sugary layers.

  • Wet or heat related persistent slab avalanches are possible in areas with poor snow structure.
  • Avoid steep rocky or forested slopes with shallow snow cover and poor snow structure.
Avalanche Problem 3
type aspect/elevation characteristics
LIKELIHOOD
LIKELY
UNLIKELY
SIZE
LARGE
SMALL
TREND
INCREASING DANGER
SAME
DECREASING DANGER
over the next 24 hours
description

Human triggered cornice falls are likely in upper elevation terrain. The warm temperatures in the past few days have caused cornices buckle and sag, and a few have calved off large chunks. The danger of natural cornice falls will rise with the temperatures.

  • Avoid ridge-top cornices, which often break further back than expected and can trigger avalanches on steep slopes below.
weather

The broad area of high pressure aloft across the western states will generate a warming trend across Utah through the end of the week.

  • Today: Rain and snow showers, mainly after noon. Some thunder is also possible. High near 40. Breezy, with a south southwest wind 22 to 25 mph, with gusts as high as 39 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. Little or no snow accumulation expected.
  • Tonight: Snow showers. Some thunder is also possible. Low around 24. Breezy, with a southwest wind 18 to 23 mph decreasing to 10 to 15 mph after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.
  • Thursday: Snow showers likely, mainly after noon. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 30. Southwest wind 9 to 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.
general announcements

Episode 6 of the UAC podcast "A Conversation with Tom Kimbrough, Hemingway of the Wasatch" is live. We explore ideas about lifetime exposure to risk and what role Buddhism has played in his life as a climber, skier, and soon-to-be octogenarian. We talk about what has changed over the years in snow science and the role of mentorship in the world of avalanche forecasting and other professions and pursuits. Check it out on ITunes, Stitcher, the UAC blog.

The UAC Marketplace is online. The holiday auction is closed, but our online marketplace still has deals on skis, packs, airbag packs, beacons, snowshoes, soft goods and much more.

The UAC has new support programs with Outdoor Research and Darn Tough. Support the UAC through your daily shopping. When you shop at Smith's, or online at Outdoor Research, REI, Backcountry.com, Darn Tough, Patagonia, NRS, Amazon, eBay a portion of your purchase will be donated to the FUAC. See our Donate Page for more details on how you can support the UAC when you shop.

Benefit the Utah Avalanche Center when you buy or sell on eBay - set the Utah Avalanche Center as a favorite non-profit in your eBay account here and click on eBay gives when you buy or sell. You can choose to have your seller fees donated to the UAC, which doesn't cost you a penny Check it out on ITunes, Stitcher, the UAC blog, or wherever you get your podcasts.

Now is a great time to practice companion rescue techniques with your backcountry partners. Here's our rescue practice video.

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Remember your information can save lives. If you see anything we should know about, please help us out by submitting snow and avalanche observations. You can also call us at 801-524-5304, email by clicking HERE, or include #utavy in your Instagram.

This advisory is from the U.S.D.A. Forest Service, which is solely responsible for its content. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur.