Avalanche Advisory
Advisory: Logan Area Mountains Issued by Toby Weed for April 16, 2014 - 6:38am
bottom line

Freezing overnight temperatures helped to solidify the saturated snow, and the danger is mostly LOW or level 1 in the backcountry. Heightened wet avalanche conditions, and a MODERATE or level 2 danger may develop on some steep sunny slopes by afternoon . Use normal caution, but evaluate the snow and terrain carefully.

‚Äč




danger scale: Low Moderate Considerable High Extreme
current conditions

It's nice and cold this morning at the 9700' CSI Logan Peak weather station, with 19 degrees and northwest winds averaging around 10 mph. We should find nice spring snow and mostly stable conditions when the snow softens up today.



recent activity

There were numerous natural wet and a few large avalanches across the mountains of northern Utah during the recent hot weather. Locally: There were a few large natural wet avalanches during the warm spell, with most of the activity last Thursday and Friday. No avalanches were reported since.

Visit our Backcountry Observations Page for details on the season's activity.

A large natural wet avalanche from the warm spell in North Hells Canyon in the Wellsville Mountain Wilderness. The avalanche was triggered by cornice-fall and ran around 2000 vertical feet. 4-11-2014.


Avalanche Problem 1
type aspect/elevation characteristics
LIKELIHOOD
LIKELY
UNLIKELY
SIZE
LARGE
SMALL
TREND
INCREASING DANGER
SAME
DECREASING DANGER
over the next 10 hours
description

Good general rule to avoid travel in the heat of midday. It's always a good idea to get an early start and leave the mountains before the saturated snow turns to mush.

Avoid and stay out from under large and overhanging cornices along major ridge-lines, which are likely to break further back than you expect and could trigger avalanches on slopes below.

weather

Check out our one-stop weather page........HERE

general announcements

Utah Avalanche Center mobile app - Get your advisory on your iPhone along with great navigation and rescue tools.

Remember your information can save lives. If you see anything we should know about, please participate in the creation of our own community avalanche advisory by submitting snow and avalanche conditions. You can also call us at 801-524-5304 or 800-662-4140, email by clicking HERE, or include #utavy in your tweet or Instagram.

Follow us at UAClogan on Twitter 

I'll issue weekend and intermittent advisories through April.

This advisory is produced by the U.S.D.A. Forest Service, which is solely responsible for its content. It describes only general avalanche conditions and local variations always exist.