Wasatch Cache National Forest

In partnership with: The Friends of the Utah Avalanche Center, Utah Department of Public Safety Division of Comprehensive Emergency Management,

Salt Lake County, and Utah State Parks:

 

To have this advisory automatically e-mailed to you each day free of charge, visit: http://www.mailermailer.com/x?oid=16351h

For photos of avalanches and avalanche phenomenon, visit: http://www.avalanche.org/%7Euac/photos_03-04.htm (Updated 3/25)

Photos sent in by observers throughout the season visit: http://www.avalanche.org/~uac/obphotos/observer.html (Updated 4/2)

For a list of backcountry avalanche activity, visit: http://www.avalanche.org/%7Euac/Avalanche_List.htm (Updated 3/31)

 

Early morning preliminary information by about 6:00 am: 801-364-1591

 

Avalanche advisory

Sunday, April 04, 2004, 7:30 am

 

Good morning, this is Drew Hardesty with the Forest Service Utah Avalanche Center with your backcountry avalanche and mountain weather advisory. Today is Sunday, April 04, 2004, and its 7:30 a.m. This forecast is brought to you in partnership with the Friends of the Utah Avalanche Center, supported in part by the Uinta Brewing Company.

 

Current Conditions:

Under mostly clear skies, temps dropped to the mid to low thirties overnight and Id expect we had a pretty decent refreeze. The southeasterly winds, after taking an afternoon siesta, are back into the 15-25 mph range this morning. With no storms in sight and the creeks hoppin from snowmelt, Im starting to feel as always for this time of year a bit sentimental about the season. Nonetheless, its still worth a walk in the hills. Arguably, the tool of choice for the backcountry appears to be snowboards or water-skis, at least by midday.

 

Avalanche Conditions:

The standard spring rules apply: get out early and keep an eye on the sog-factor as things heat up. Timing is everything here, and I waited an hour after a steep south-facing slope had become shaded to ski down to the road. While the plumbing system within the snowpack itself seems to be smooth, its the upper 4-10 of last weeks snow that can still sluff as it takes its time to consolidate above the old melt freeze crust. Natural wet sluffs on all aspects are still commonplace and even one notorious backcountry skier was knocked over by a wet mucker he triggered on a steep north-facing rollover not an hour after I complimented him on him being on his best behavior this winter.

 

Bottom Line for the Salt Lake, Park CITY, Provo, and ogden AREA MOUNTAINS:

There is generally a LOW avalanche danger this morning that will rise to moderate during the heat of the day.

 

Uinta Mountains: For Uinta specific information, click on Western Uintas on the advisory page or phone 1-800-648-7433.

Logan: click HERE or call 435-797-4146

 

Mountain Weather:

Today will be partly cloudy with light southeasterly winds. 8 and 10,000 highs will be in the mid forties and mid thirties, respectively. The Low to the south may kick in a little moisture by evening and off and on through Tuesday. Thunderstorms may not be out of the question either. The next splitter should hit Utah by late Tuesday that will likely bring only clouds, a wind shift, and cooler temps. No promising storms are on the horizon.

 

For specific digital forecasts for the Salt Lake, Provo or Ogden mountains, CLICK HERE.

 

General Information:

We will continue to issue morning forecasts for another week, and then well go to intermittent afternoon updates after the Easter weekend.

 

The Wasatch Powderbird Guides did not fly yesterday, and today will be in the Bountiful Sessions, AF, Snake Creek and Provo.

 

If you are getting into the backcountry, please give us a call and let us know what youre seeing, especially if you trigger an avalanche. You can leave a message at 524-5304 or 1-800-662-4140. Or you can e-mail an observation to [email protected] .org, or you can fax an observation to 801-524-6301.

 

The information in this advisory is from the U.S. Forest Service, which is solely responsible for its content. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur.

 

I will update this advisory Monday morning.

 

Thanks for calling.

 

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