Avalanche: Beaver Mountain Backside

Observer Name
‎Will Hamann‎, Collin Child
Observation Date
Friday, December 16, 2016
Occurrence Date
Friday, December 16, 2016
Occurence Time
12:30pm

Region:

Location Name or Route
Beaver Backside
Elevation
8000
Aspect
Southeast
Slope Angle
30
Trigger
Unknown
Avalanche Type
Wet Loose
Avalanche Problem
Storm Slab
Weak Layer
New Snow/Old Snow Interface
Depth
18"
Width
80
Vertical
250
Comments
We were skiing the far west saddle along Beaver Backside, we took one run and kept a high traverse line reach Spring Trail, we came back for a second lap and the toe of a slide had covered our traverse line. Looked to be a pretty obvious new snow old snow interface slide. The debris field was quite dense with heavier wet snow. The crown looked to be about 18 inches deep. It fractured a pretty wide area and slid down several different aspects. Although Beaver Backside is not know for its avalanche terrain please use caution while skiing in this area. Treat it like you would any other zone in the Logan Area.
Comments

Forecaster's note:  Thanks for the info and the heads up!  The Beaver Mt Backside is certainly backcountry, and you should treat it as such.  Use good travel protocols, go with a partner, cross steep slopes one at a time, beacon, probe, shovel...  Although not known for frequent avalanches, obviously there are numerous slopes in the area capable of producing avalanches, and as this is all undisturbed snow with a fresh load on top, now is certainly a time when you could trigger one.

Coordinates